Isles of the Many Gods

April 2, 2013

The Isles of the Many Gods
An A-Z of the Pagan Gods and Goddesses worshipped in Ancient Britain during the First Millenium CE through to the Middle Ages.
By Sorita d’Este and David Rankine

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islesofthemanygods

The British Isles have long been seen as a place of mystery & magic. For many thousands of years successive waves of invaders each brought their own gods & goddesses with them, often assimilating the beliefs of the tribes they conquered. The Celtic races merged with the indigenous people, they were conquered by the Romans, who brought with them deities from all over the Roman Empire (including Greece & Egypt). After them came the Saxons & other Germanic tribes, further adding to the rich tapestry that forms part of our spiritual heritage today. The Isles of the Many Gods brings together, for the first time, information on the worship of these deities in Britain, in an easy to use A-Z. It includes both the native & immigrant gods & goddesses, from well known gods like Apollo, Brigit, Freya, Herne, Isis, Mars & Woden to lesser known ones like Abandinus, Arianrhod, Genii Cucullati, Midir, Vitiris & the Wheel God. There are more than 240 entries providing information regarding the evidence of their worship in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland & the Isle of Man. Drawing from archaeology, architecture, art, artefacts, currency, place-names & literature thereby providing an excellent reference work for those interested in the spiritual beliefs of our ancestors.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Author’s Foreword
Author’s Notes
1. Evidence for Inclusion
2. The Argument for Divinity
The Origins of the Gods
Literary Evidence
Literature Timeline
The Unnamed Gods
The Christian Influence

A –Z
Key to understanding A-Z entries:

A
Abandinus
Abraxas
Aegil
Aeron
Aesculapius
Agroná
Áine
Alaisagae
Alator
Amaethon
Ammon
Ancasta
Andescociuoucus
Andraste
Anextiomarus
Angus Mac Og
Anicetus
Antenocitus
Anubis
Aoibheall
Apollo
Arawn
Arecurius
Arianrhod
Arimanius
Arnemetia
Astarte
Atargatis
Attis

B
Badb
Bacchus
Baldur
Balor
Banba
Barrecis
Bastet
Bé Chuille
Belatucadros
Belenus
Beli
Belisama
Bellona
Bé Néit
Bes
Bilé
Black Annis
Blodeuwedd
Boann
Bona Dea
Bonus Eventus
Braciaca
Bran
Branwen
Bregans
Bres
Brian
Brigantia
Brigit
Britannia
Búanann

C
Caelestis
Cailleach
Callirius
Camulos
Carman
Cautes
Cautopates
Ceres
Ceridwen
Cernunnos
Clídna
Cocidius
Concordia
Condatis
Contrebis
Corotiacus
Coventina
Creidhne
Cuda
Cunobelinus
Cupid
Cybele

D
Daghda
Danu
Deo Qui Vias et Semitas Commentus Est
Diana
Dian Cecht
Disciplina
Dolichenus
Don
Donn
Dylan

E
Edeyrn
Eostra
Epona
Erce
Ériu
Ernmas
Étaín

F
Fates
Faunus
Fea
Fedelm
Fergus
Flidais
Fortuna
Fotla
Frigg/Freya

G
Garmangabi
Geat
Gilvaethwy
Gobannos
Goibniu
Govannon
Grannos
Grián
Gwenwynwyn
Gwydion
Gwyn ap Nudd

H
Harimella
Harpocrates
Helioserapis
Helith
Hercules
Herne
Hiccafrith
Horus
Hreda
Hu Gadarn
Hygiaea

I
Ialonus
Ing
Isis
Iuchar
Iucharba
J
Juno
Jupiter
K
Kymideu Kymeinvoll

L
Latis
Lenus
Lir
Lleu Llaw Gyffes
Llyr
Loki
London Hunter God
Loucetius
Luchta
Ludd
Lugh

M
Mabon
Macha
Manannán MacLir
Manawyddan
Maponus
Mars
Math Mathonwy
Matunus
Medb
Medigenus
Medocius
Mercury
Methe
Midir
Minerva
Mithras
Modron
Mogons
Morrígan

N
Nantosuelta
Nechtan
Néit
Neith
Nemain
Nemesis
Nemetius
Nemetona
Neptune
Nerthus
Nodens
Nuada
Nudd
Nyx

O
Oceanus
Ocelus
Ogma
Olloudius
Olwen
Onirus

P

Pan
Panakeia
Pax
Penarddun
Priapus
Pryderi
Pwyll
R
Rata
Rhiannon
Ricagumbeda
Rider God
Rigisamus
Rigonemetis
Roma
Rosmerta

S
Sabrina
Saitada
Salus
Saturn
Scáthach
Seaxnéat
Segomo
Serapis
Setlocenia
Silvanus
Sionna
Sol Invictus
Soter
Spes
Sucellos
Sulis

T
Tailtiu
Taranis
Tethys
Terminus
Teutates
Thoth
Thunor
Tiw
Tridamus
Tyche

V
Vanuntus
Venus
Verbeia
Vernostonus
Victoria
Vinotonus
Viradecthis
Viridios
Vitiris
Vulcan

W
Weland
Wheel God
Woden

Genealogies
The Welsh Pantheon
The Irish Pantheon
Timelines
Historical Timeline
The Return of the Pagan Gods
Bibliography
Index

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Extracts from reviews:

“Wow, what a fantastic book!
I’m one of those people who, when doing research, hates to be surrounded by tons of different books searching through pages of useless info to find that 1 page that holds the information I’m looking for.
David and Sorita have done all the hard work for you here, a book that contains information on the Gods and Goddesses that were worshiped in Britain. Over 240 entries, this is a fantastic reference book.” S. King, Amazon Reviewer

“The Isle of the Many Gods is a wonderful new addition to the study of the deities in ancient Britain.
Rankine and D’Este provides a well researched, well written overview of the numerous gods and goddesses.” Hobbit, Amazon Reviewer

“Most of the entries are encylcopediac and numerous . There is a chart on the top which tells you their place of origin, where they were worshipped, what literary evidence reamin of them and their other names. The entries tell the reader what they were worshipped for and what areas of life they were in charge of. Entries also expalin what artifacts of them remain. Most deities have roughly half a page to maybe a page of information on them pending availability of knowledge available. Sometime there are scant remains or scant references to the various deities. Other deities have sometimes up to 5 pages on them and they are detailed.” S. Cranow, Amazon Reviewer

“I have to give them big kudos for the quality of research and documentation that is included in this book. The bibliography is probably the largest I’ve ever seen in association with a pagan book, and it is not mostly referencing other pagan authors. Rather, this is a scholarly work, and if you have ever done any historical research on the British Isles, you will recognize some of these names.” Margaret A. Foster, Amazon Reviewer

“Why is this book different? Because, as I turned the pages, I have not only been surprised by the wealth of knowledge and information between its covers, but also been very pleased with the level of writing and scholarship. A lot of research must have gone into this book and it surpasses any other on the market by far.” Ruggedwest, Amazon Reviewer

“This book succeeds at being a great reference work for pagan deities worshipped in the British isles in the pre-Christian period. I was pleasantly surprised to find more than I expected. There were Celtic deities, Roman ones, Greek, Egyptian, Persian (these ones coming over to this country with the Roman occupation), Saxon one and more. I was particularly pleased that the authors avoided idle speculation, but backed up their work with verifiable archaeological and literary sources.” Samuel N. Rex, Amazon Reviewer

“David and Sorita, the authors, state that the period they are looking at covers the 1st Millenium to the Middle Ages and this is a good basis for understanding what you will find in this book. I think if you look a little further, some of the Gods they discuss actually predate this period and they even give some clues in the text as to the possible origin of some of the original god-names. The Name Gobannon, from Gaul, for example, seemingly predates the Govannon of the Welsh and the Goibhniu of the Irish.” Gary & Ruth, Celtic Myth Podshow (Review on Goodreads)

 

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